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"My goal in life is to be as good of a person my dog already thinks I am."

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Bull Terrier

The Bull Terrier or English Bull Terrier is a breed of dog in the terrier family.

Appearance
Bull Terriers are thick-set and muscular with a short, dense coat. Acceptable colours for show dogs are white, (skin pigmentation and markings on the head are not penalised in the UK show ring), any colour other than white, or any colour with white markings (although blue and liver are highly undesirable).

The Bull Terrier's most recognizable feature is its head, described as 'egg shaped' when viewed from the front, almost flat at the top, with a Roman muzzle sloping evenly down to the end of the nose with no stop. The unique triangle-shaped eyes are small, dark, and closely set. The body is full and round, while the shoulders are robust and muscular and the tail is carried horizontally. It walks with a jaunty gait, and is popularly known as the 'gladiator of the canine race'.

There is no designated height or weight for the breed but the average is, Height: 51-61 cm (20-24 inches), Weight: 15-33 kg (35-72 pounds) The Bull Terrier and the Miniature Bull Terrier are the only recognised breeds that have triangle-shaped eyes.

Temperament
Bull Terriers are known as friendly and outgoing dogs, even having a "clownish" attitude about them. Their physical strength is matched by their intelligence, and both body and mind need to be kept active. They can be fun and playful. As a breed they are generally placid and will not normally make the first move. They are very affectionate dogs that love human company. Bull Terriers are particularly good with children, and usually have a high pain threshold, which reduces the risk of injury from a defensive bite. Younger dogs, however, may regard children as playmates and because of their strength could cause inadvertent injury. They are protective of children in their charge. Bull Terriers do not make as good a guard dog as people think due to their fondness for people, but will defend their "pack" if needed. However, potential owners of this breed should be aware that Bull Terriers can be extremely aggressive and are capable of seriously injuring or killing other animals.

The American Temperament Test Society, Inc. (ATTS), a not-for-profit organization that promotes uniform temperament testing for dog breeds, gives the Bull Terrier a pass rate of 91.5%. The average for all breeds is 81.5%.

 

Bull TerrierOther names: English Bull Terrier, Pig dog (obsolete)
Country of origin: England
Weight: 20-33 kg (45-72 pounds.)
Height: 51-61 cm (20-24 inches.)
Coat: Short, dense
Litter size: 5
Life span: 10-12 years

Health
All puppies should be checked for deafness, as this sometimes occurs (most commonly in pure white dogs) and is difficult to notice, especially in a relatively young puppy. Many Bull Terriers have a tendency to develop skin allergies. Insect bites, such as fleas, and sometimes mosquitoes and mites, can produce a generalized allergic response of hives, rash, and itching. This condition can be stopped by keeping the dog free of contact from these insects, but this is definitely a consideration in climates or circumstances where exposure to these insects is inevitable. Their lifespan is somewhere between 10 and 14 years, although they can live longer - the oldest female Bull Terrier on record being an Australian housepet dubbed "Puppa Trout" who remained sprightly into her 17th year. The second oldest female Bull Terrier on record is "Boots Moon Stomp Stout (Crain)" of Denver, Colorado USA. Boots lived to be 16 years of age.

The Bull Terrier's coat is easy to maintain, but grooming can keep it in near-perfect condition. Adding oils to their meals can also vastly improve the quality of their coat.[citation needed] The Bull Terrier requires a fair amount of exercise, but overworking the dog at a young age will cause strained muscles. Older dogs do require exercise, but in small doses, whereas younger ones will be happy to play for hours on end. The breed is renowned for being extremely greedy; be sure to maintain a good balance of exercise and food, or the dog can become overweight. Also, be sure to check ears, eyes, nose and mouth every day for signs of infection.

Common Ailments: Deafness, Umbilical Hernia and Acne.

History
The Bull Terrier was developed in England during the 1860s and 1870s. During the 1860s and 1870s the Old English Bulldog had already been extinct for decades, and James Hinks of Birmingham employed the services of his own modern English bulldog named "Madman", the English White Terrier (which was not a working or sporting terrier, the White English Terrier began its creation in the 1860s, and was first presented to the public in 1864).[5] A breeder crossed the English White Terrier with the New English Bulldog to create the Bull Terrier.

Colored Bull Terriers are due to Bull Terrier breeders crossing their dogs with Staffordshire Bull Terriers in the 1900s.

With the Original Bull and Terrier blood, combined with an injection of an original strain of Bull and Terrier blood from the Staffordshire Bull Terrier in the early 1900s, the Bull Terrier still remains a formidable sporting Terrier.